Fish Eye



Fish Eye was recently selected as an official selection of Berlin Art Film Festival in the short experimental category. The film explores the struggle of expression through the eyes of a homeless man's soul wandering through a diverse city. It is a 15-minute stylized film starting from the perspective of a homeless artist. After his sudden death on the streets, his soul wanders around the city viewing strange instances in different peoples lives as they pass by each other. It is an honest look into the conversations and deep emotions of 22 city dwellers. Their perspectives range broadly from backgrounds of the rich, the poor, young, old, businessmen and criminals. They each individually explain their own personal philosophies on why things are the way they are, and why they do what they do. This all forms a subtle but inescapable theme: Confidence is silent, and insecurities are loud. Fisheye was shot all in one take around 8 city blocks. We utilized 22 improvisational actors from the Chicago-land area with professional backgrounds.


Colin Parker, the director of Fish Eye is a passionate filmmaker who has an eclectic style in everything from commercial production work to experimental animation. He graduated from the College of DuPage with a certificate in Animation and Film. He has done several hundred hours of pro bono work for United Way and now works as a Videographer for Bureau Gravity, a marketing company located in his home town of Aurora, IL.

Colin’s drive to tell stories started at a young age. At home, he couldn’t resist making his friends and family laugh at every opportunity. His love for drawing, computed graphics, and skateboarding drove his creative mind to explore more ways to tell stories. FISHEYE is the culmination of some of Colin’s most experimental artistic visions. The film is an expression of the deep feelings of chaos and disorder that Colin felt as a child, walking through the city streets of Chicago. The film also expresses the lack of human connection that people have with each other today. Instead of listening and really engaging one another, we regurgitate something everyone has heard before.